We were crying when we heard the news. That’s why we

got on the first flight,” said Gulshad Ali from Auckland, New Zeal

and. “We just came here to support the family and friends and people who’ve been affected.”

Ali said she didn’t know the Mustafas but extended her sympathies to them.

Calls of Allahu Akbar could be heard in surrounding streets as guests were led through Islamic prayers.Mourners attend a fu

neral for victims of the twin mosque attacks at the Memorial Park cemetery in Christchurch on March 20, 2019.

Mourners then emerged from the tent, carrying open wooden bo

xes on their shoulders to the burial site where 50 graves have been dug.

Guests consider it a mark of respect to throw dirt on the graves of the dead to help send them to the next life.

sha419.com

No-deal Brexit happens next week and no one knows if the EU

is deep into its most crucial week since the last one.

On Thursday, Theresa May travels to Brussels to meet with the remaining 27 EU leaders, where she is expected to request an extension to Article 50, the legal

process by which Britain is leaving the EU. If the EU27 agree, as they probably will, Brexit will be delayed beyond the current deadline of March 29. Lea

ving aside the gravity of this epic failure of British Brexit policy, the key question is how long will the delay last?

There are two likely options. The first is a short delay, which Downing Street said on Wedne

sday it would request. This would give the UK government a little more time to get its Withdrawal Agr

eement through Parliament, perhaps sweetened with some changes to the accompanying political declaration.

Or, the EU could offer May a much longer extension, possibly lasting years, to give to the UK more breathing space in which to u

ntangle its Brexit mess. The EU says it would only grant a longer delay if there was a good reason for doing so.

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After rejecting May’s Brexit deal last week, MPs voted in favor

  tension to the withdrawal process, given the unlikelihood of agreeing a deal before Mar

ch 29. May is expected to ask the remaining 27 EU member states for a delay at this week’s summit.

  It’s possible the EU may propose a long extension to the Brexit process and require the UK to take part in the upcoming European elections in May.

  Downing Street has used the prospect of a lengthy delay — which could be used to force a second

referendum — to try to persuade Brexiteer lawmakers that they risk losing Brexit altogether if they don’t vo

te for May’s deal.The man who opened fire on two New Zealand mosques last week may have succeeded in killing 50 pe

ople, but the country’s leader has promised to deny him the one thing he truly wanted: Notoriety.

  ”You will never hear me mention his name,” Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern told the New Zealand Parliament Tuesday.

  ”He is a terrorist, he is a criminal, he is an extremist, but he will, when I speak, be nameless, and

to others I implore you: Speak the names of those who were lost rather than the name of the man who took t

hem. He may have sought notoriety but we in New Zealand will give him nothing — not even his name.”

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The shooting at the mosque on Deans Avenue next to Hag

  Park, is near to Cathedral Square, where children were taking part in a global protest to raise awareness for climate change.

  ”If your child was attending the climate change protest in Cathedral Square and you want to check if they are in the Civic O

ffices, please call the Council Contact Centre on 03-941-8999,” Christchurch City Council said.

  Christchurch is a coastal city of around 400,000 residents. It is the third most populous

city in New Zealand behind Auckland and Wellington. It has an agricultural economy.

  In 2010 and 2011 the city suffered a series of devastating earthquakes, with the most destructi

ve at 6.3 magnitude, which killed nearly 200 people and destroyed thousands of buildings.

  Just 1% of New Zealand‘s population of almost 5 million are Muslim, according to government statistics, less than 50,000 people in 2013.

  Journalist Chris Lynch, a radio host on New Zealand station ZB Radio, told CNN that o

ne of the shootings had occurred at “the biggest mosque in all of Christchurch.”

  He described Christchurch as a “very peaceful city” that is still getting over the devastating 6.3 magnitude earthquake that hit in 2011.

njywsh.com

All the members should remain conscientious and har

dworking, and bravely take responsibility,” he said. “There are no honorary members, only responsible members.”

Political adviser He Yun’ao, from Jiangsu province, said this year’s session was busy and substantial.

“I got up early and got to sleep late to read more material so as to im

prove my proposals,” he said. “The meeting was over, but Chairman Wang has given us man

y assignments. I will do more surveys and study this year and bring better proposals next year.”

Zhang Zhihao and Wang Kaihao contributed to this story.

hina’s poverty relief battle is the world’s biggest and toughest. Over the last 30-plus ye

ars, China has made determined and innovative efforts to reduce poverty and remarkable achievements have been witnessed.

In this exclusive interview, an episode of China Daily’s two sessions special coverage answe

ring questions put forward by media outlets from more than 20 countries, Lei Ming, dean of the Insti

tute of Poverty Research, Peking University, shares his view on the ways of the toughest poverty-relief battle.

ashmh.com

Key GOP senator with aviation oversight says he would “pr

  Republican Sen. John Thune — who has oversight of the aviation industry and the FAA as a member of the Aviation subcommit

tee of the Commerce and Transportation Committee — said Tuesday he would “prefer flying on some other plane” rather than Boeing’s 737 MAX 8.

  Thune, who is also a the second-ranking Senate Republican leader, seemed to suggest he would be open to ground

ing the planes if the evidence pointed to it, but stopped short of saying the planes should be grounded at this po

int unless and until an NTSB investigation finds there is a problem with the plane.

  He said he will also wait for the investigation before considering hearings in

his subcommittee. He said he has not talked to anyone at Boeing about his concerns.

  Reporter: Would you safe flying a Super Max 8 right now? Would you fly on it?

  Senator Thune: “Uhh…well, I guess I would uh, probably like everybody else, prefer flying on some other plane.”

ltdlc.cn

As Manafort faced his judgment day, Cohen was facing

  fresh attacks on his credibility amid accusations that he lied to Congress during his explosive testimony last week.

  Trump’s former attorney told lawmakers that he had never asked for and would not ac

cept a pardon from Trump. Yet multiple sources told CNN’s Gloria Borger that the prospect of a par

don was raised more than once between Cohen’s lawyer and attorneys representing the President.

  The matter is being investigated in Congress following Cohen’s public and private testimony before three congressional committees over the past two weeks.

  In question is whether there was an effort to seek a pardon or offer a pardon in exchange for

the cooperation who will go to prison in May after admitting tax and financial crimes and lying to Congress.

  Rep. Elijah Cummings, the Maryland Democrat who chairs the House Oversight Com

mittee, said he told Cohen that he would “nail you to the cross” if he did not tell the truth to lawmakers again.

  ”I’m going to study the transcript first, that’s No. 1. I’m going to see what the allegations are and then I’ll go from there,” Cummings told CNN’s Manu Raju.

  Trump is not waiting for any investigation to take a new shot at his former legal fixer, tw

eeting an MSNBC headline: “Cohen’s lawyer contradicts Cohen’s testimony about never seeking a Presidential Pardon.

ash166.cn

Thanks to the impact of the China-US trade conflicts,obal for

gn direct investment is in the dumps. The Global Investment Trends Monitor

issued by the UN Conference on Trade and Development shows global foreign dir

ect investment fell by a large margin-19 percent-last year, marking a third straight year of decline.

But China bucked the trend, as 60,533 foreign-invested enterprise

s started business in China last year with the actual use of foreign investment reaching $132

.12 billion, a year-on-year growth of 69.8 percent and 0.9 percent, respectively. Among which, high-tech ma

nufacturing grew 35.1 percent, reflecting foreign investors’ optimism on China’s growth potential.

The draft foreign investment law shows China’s firm resolve to build an open economy. And the strength of the draft law

is that it complies with the trends and changes in the global investment system and stipulates more thorough and expl

icit implementation of the pre-establishment national treatment with the negative list for foreign investment, and

embodies foreign investors’ appeal to ensure freer and more convenient investment.

nj419snlt.com

While that struggle was raging, waste-to-energy pow

  plant business owner Lee Won-jeong in 2017 bought the site from Kim, but kept him on as manager. Lee is based in Busan, in the south of the country, and claims he was unaware of the problems at the site.

  Lee says that after the sale, Kim deposited more than 80 times the amount of g

arbage permitted at the site, including household waste, construction materials, and discarded polymer.

  The manager of the site had a permit to dump 2,000 tons of waste, the site holds more than 80 times that now.

  As the trash mountain decomposed, gas built up under the surface. In December last year, fires began to appear.

  Lee says that when he learned of Kim’s misconduct he fired him. Kim has since disappeared and CNN was unable to reach him for comment.

  Kwon Hyun-soo, the Uiseong county environmental supervisor, says local authorities ar

e using their own resources to tackle the trash but the flaming mountain is too big for them to resolve.

  ”The waste is mostly from outside of our region. It’s too much for us to take care of the issue at the local level,” says Kwon.

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This environment created a black market in which bro

  okers will offer to dispose of waste at below the market rate.

  Brokers charge between $130 and $170 to dump a ton of waste in a sparsely

populated part of the country, says Lee, Kim’s former boss.

  Not only can this be a lucrative source of income, the fines for illegal

dumping are only about $3,000, Lee says.

  Lee estimates that Kim pocketed upwards of $22 million this way, judging by the extra trash that was found at his site.

  A new dumping ground

  Since the China ban, South Korea has been using Southeast Asia as a

dumping ground for much of its non-recyclable waste.

  The country now exports 10 times more waste to the Philippines and

almost 30 times mor

e to Thailand than it did before Beijing’s ban. But not all the waste sent abroad is

disposed of legally.

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