anyone traveled day after day with the same pilot it was only

anyone traveled day after day with the same pilot it was only natural that they

should establish19 more or less friendly relations and exchange odds and ends

about each other. Thinking it over carefully, the girl realized that except for the

 

facts that Mrs. Pollzoff’s husband had come to the United States from Russia

when he was a lad, that he had gone into the fur business, and had been dead

two years, she knew nothing more than the bit of information gleaned in the

 

office regarding the failure to pass the flying tests to fly her own machine.

“Follow the coast south and keep outside the Government limit,” Mrs.

 

Pollzoff directed after they had been in the air about an hour. “Have you

plenty of gas? I want to remain up several hours.”

 

“Plenty,” Roberta assured her but she was becoming really puzzled about

her passenger. It could not be possible that Mrs. Pollzoff was in search of

vessels carrying liquor, for she never showed the slightest interest in ships

of any description when they were sighted, but this was the first time she

 

expressed a desire to keep beyond the jurisdiction of the United States.

The request was strange and the girl pilot felt oddly disturbed by it.

Mamaji studied in Paris for two years, thanks to the colonialadministra

tion.

 

He had the time of his life. This was in theearly 1930s, when the French

were still trying to makePondicherry as Gallic as the British were trying to

 

make therest of India Britannic. I don’t recall exactly what Mamajistudied. S

omething commercial, I suppose. He was a greatstoryteller, but forget

 

about his studies or the Eiffel Tower orthe Louvre or the cafés of the

Champs-Elysées. All his storieshad to do with swimming

pools and swimming competitions.

For example, there was the Piscine Deligny, the city’s oldestpool, dating back

to 1796, an open-air barge moored to theQuai d’Orsay and the venue for

the swimming events of the1900 Olympics. But none of the times were

recognized by theInternational Swimming Federation because the pool

was sixmetres too long. The water in the pool came straight

 

from theSeine,

unfiltered and

unheated. “It was

cold and dirty,”

shlfccc.com

General’sAcademic Medal, the University of Toronto’s

General’sAcademic Medal, the University of Toronto’s highestundergraduate award,

of which no small number of illustriousCanadians have been recipients, were it not

for a beef-eatingpink boy with a neck like a tree trunk and a

temperament ofunbearable good cheer.

I still smart a little at the slight. When you’ve suffered agreat deal in life, each

additional pain is both unbearable andtrifling. My life is like a memento mori

painting from Europeanart: there is always a grinning skull at my side to remind

meof the folly of human ambition. I mock this skull. I look at itand I say,

 

“You’ve got the wrong fellow. You may not believein life, but I don’t believe

in death. Move on!” The skullsnickers and moves ever closer,

but that doesn’t surprise me.shlf1314

The reason death sticks so closely to life isn’t biologicalnecessity – it’s envy. Life is

so beautiful that death has fallen inlove with it, a jealous,

possessive love that grabs at what it can.shlf1314

But life leaps over oblivion lightly, losing only a thing or two ofno importance,

and gloom is but the passing shadow of acloud. The pink boy also got the

nod from the RhodesScholarship committee. I love him and I hope his time

 

atOxford was a rich experience. If Lakshmi, goddess of wealth,one day

favours me bountifully, Oxford is fifth on the list ofcities I would like to

visit before I pass on, after Mecca,Varanasi, Jerusalem and Paris.shlf1314

I have nothing to say of my working life, only that a tie is anoose, and

inverted though it is, it will hang a man nonethelessif he’s not careful.

 

“It isn’t much of a hop, and as Mrs. Pollzoff has all the earmarks of being a

good customer, she must be humored,” Phil grinned. “Just the same, I’m

 

glad they wished her on you and Nike instead of the Moth and yours truly.”

“Well, it’s no particular fun piloting her. I wish she’d decide she wants variety,

 

and14 give you all a chance at the job,” Roberta told him. They were making

their way to where the Moth, Phil’s own imported machine, waited to leap

in the air with them. “I say, when is Mr. Howe going to start shlf1314

 

that investigation

he spoke of a few

weeks ago. Heard

anything about it?”

shlfbbb.com

“Top of the morning to you,” Phil called cheerily. “Your

“Top of the morning to you,” Phil called cheerily. “Your esteemed passenger

wants to make an early start, so the boys will have Nike warmed up for

you and you can start as soon as you get to the field.”

 

“It’s mighty good of you to come and fetch me,” Roberta smiled at the

president’s son, who had not so many weeks before gone through a series

of exciting, dangerous air-adventures with her. But those things were all in

the day’s work and belonged to the past; the new day awaited them.

 

“It isn’t much of a hop, and as Mrs. Pollzoff has all the earmarks of being a

good customer, she must be humored,” Phil grinned. “Just the same, I’m

glad they wished her on you and Nike instead of the Moth and yours truly.”

 

“Well, it’s no particular fun piloting her. I wish she’d decide she wants variety,

and14 give you all a chance at the job,” Roberta told him. They were making

their way to where the Moth, Phil’s own imported machine, waited to leap in

 

the air with them. “I say, when is Mr. Howe going to start that investigation

he spoke of a few weeks ago. Heard anything about it?”

 

I never had problems with my fellow scientists. Scientists area friendly, atheistic,

hard-working, beer-drinking lot whose mindsare preoccupied with sex, chess

and baseball when they arenot preoccupied with science.

I was a very good student, if I may say so myself. I wastops at St. Michael’s

College four years in a row. I got everypossible student award from the

 

Department of Zoology. If Igot none from the Department of Religious Studies,

it is simplybecause there are no student awards in this department (therewards

of religious study are not in mortal hands, we allknow that). I would have

 

received the Governor General’sAcademic Medal, the University of Toronto’s

highestundergraduate award, of which no small number of illustriousCanadians

have been recipients, were it not for a beef-eatingpink boy with a neck like a

 

tree trunk and a

temperament

ofunbearable

good cheer.

www.shlfaaa.com

“They speak a funny Englishin India. They like words like

“They speak a funny Englishin India. They like words like bamboozle.” I remembered

hiswords as my plane started its descent towards Delhi, so theword bamboozle was

my one preparation for the rich, noisy,functioning madness of India. I used the

 

word on occasion,and truth be told, it served me well. To a clerk at a trainstation I said,

“I didn’t think the fare would be soexpensive. You’re, not trying to bamboozle me, are

you?” Hesmiled and chanted, “No sir! There is no bamboozlementhere. I have quoted

 

you the correct fare.”This second time to India I knew better what to expectand I knew

what I wanted: I would settle in a hill stationand write my novel. I had visions of myself

sitting at atable on a large veranda, my notes spread out in front ofme next to a

 

steaming cup of tea. Green hills heavy withmists would lie at my feet and the shrill

cries of monkeyswould fill my ears. The weather would be just right,requiring a light

sweater mornings and evenings, andsomething short-sleeved midday. Thus set up,

 

pen in hand,for the sake of greater truth, I would turn Portugal into afiction. That’s

what fiction is about, isn’t it, the selectivetransforming of reality? The twisting of it

to bring out itsessence? What need did I have to go to Portugal?

The lady who ran the place would tell me stories aboutthe struggle to boot the

British out. We would agree onwhat I was to have for lunch and supper the next day.

 

Despite the grueling schedule, the more that Jobs immersed himself in Apple, the more

he realized that he would not be able to walk away. When Michael Dell was asked at a

computer trade show in October 1997 what he would do if he were Steve Jobs and

 

taking over Apple, he replied, “I’d shut it down and give the money back to the

shareholders.” Jobs fired off an email to Dell. “CEOs are supposed to have class,”

it said. “I can see that isn’t an opinion you hold.” Jobs liked to stoke up rivalries as

 

a way to rally his team—he had done so with IBM and Microsoft—and he did so

with Dell. When he called together his managers to institute a build-to-order

system for manufacturing and distribution, Jobs used as a backdrop a blown-up

picture of Michael Dell with a target on his face.

 

“We’re coming after

you, buddy,”

he said to cheers

from his troops.

www.shlfdd.com

That week he gathered his top managers and staff in the Apple

That week he gathered his top managers and staff in the Apple auditorium

for a rally, followed by a picnic featuring beer and vegan food, to celebrate

his new role and the company’s new ads. He was wearing shorts, walking

 

around the campus barefoot, and had a stubble of beard. “I’ve been back

about ten weeks, working really hard,” he said, looking tired but deeply

determined. “What we’re trying to do is not highfalutin. We’re trying to get

 

back to the basics of great products, great marketing, and great distribution.

Apple has drifted away from doing the basics really well.”

For a few more weeks Jobs and the board kept looking for a permanent CEO.

 

Various names surfaced—George M. C. Fisher of Kodak, Sam Palmisano at

IBM, Ed Zander at Sun Microsystems—but most of the candidates were

 

understandably reluctant to consider becoming CEO if Jobs was going to remain

an active board member. The San Francisco Chronicle reported that Zander declined

to be considered because he “didn’t want Steve looking over his shoulder,

 

second-guessing him on every decision.” At one point Jobs and Ellison pulled

a prank on a clueless computer consultant who was campaigning for the job; they

sent him an email saying that he had been selected, which caused both amusement

and embarrassment when stories appeared in the papers

 

that they were just toying with him.

By December it had become clear that Jobs’s iCEO status had evolved from

interim to indefinite. As Jobs continued to run the company, the board quietly

deactivated its search. “I went back to Apple and tried to hire a CEO, with the help

 

of a recruiting agency, for almost four months,” he recalled. “But they didn’t

produce the right people. That’s why I finally stayed. Apple

was in no shape to attract anybody good.”

The problem Jobs faced was that running two companies was brutal.

 

Looking back on it,

he traced his

health problems

back to those days:

www.qianhuanet.com

Here’s to the crazy ones. The misfits. The rebels. The

Here’s to the crazy ones. The misfits. The rebels. The troublemakers.

The round pegs in the square holes. The ones who see things differently.

They’re not fond of rules. And they have no respect for the status quo.

 

You can quote them, disagree with them, glorify or vilify them. About the

only thing you can’t do is ignore them. Because they change things. They

push the human race forward. And while some may see them as the crazy

ones, we see genius. Because the people who are crazy enough

In order to evoke the spirit of Dead Poets Society, Clow and Jobs wanted to

get Robin Williams to read the narration. His agent said that Williams didn’t

do ads, so Jobs tried to call him directly. He got through to Williams’s wife,

who would not let him talk to the actor because she knew how persuasive

he could be. They also considered Maya Angelou and Tom Hanks. At a

fund-raising dinner featuring Bill Clinton that fall, Jobs pulled the president

aside and asked him to telephone Hanks to talk him into it, but the

president pocket-vetoed the request. They ended up with Richard

Dreyfuss, who was a dedicated Apple fan.

 

to think they can change the world are the ones who do.

Jobs, who could identify with each of those sentiments, wrote some of the

lines himself, including “They push the human race forward.” By the time of

 

the Boston Macworld in early August, they had produced a rough version.

They agreed it was not ready, but Jobs used the concepts, and the “think

different” phrase, in his keynote speech there. “There’s a germ of a brilliant

 

idea there,” he said at the time. “Apple is about people who think outside

the box, who want to use computers to help them change the world.”

They debated the grammatical issue: If “different” was supposed to modify

 

the verb “think,” it should be an adverb, as in “think differently.” But Jobs

insisted that he wanted “different” to be used as a noun, as in “think victory”

 

or “think beauty.” Also, it echoed colloquial use, as in “think big.” Jobs later

explained, “We discussed whether it was correct before we ran it. It’s grammatical,

 

if you think about what we’re trying to say. It’s not think the same, it’s

think different. Think a little different, think a lot different,

 

think different.

‘Think differently’

wouldn’t hit the

meaning for me.”

www.qianhuavc.com

Woz had already begun thinking about the next version of the

Woz had already begun thinking about the next version of the machine, so

they started calling their current model the Apple I. Jobs and Woz would

drive up and down Camino Real trying to get the electronics stores to sell it.

 

In addition to the fifty sold by the Byte Shop and almost fifty sold to friends,

they were building another hundred for retail outlets. Not surprisingly, they

had contradictory impulses: Wozniak wanted to sell them for about what it

 

cost to build them, but Jobs wanted to make a serious profit. Jobs prevailed.

He picked a retail price that was about three times what it cost to build the

boards and a 33% markup over the $500 wholesale price that Terrell and

 

other stores paid. The result was $666.66. “I was always into repeating digits,”

Wozniak said. “The phone number for my dial-a-joke service was 255-6666.”

Neither of them knew that in the Book of Revelation 666 symbolized the

 

“number of the beast,” but they soon were faced with complaints, especially

after 666 was featured in that year’s hit movie, The Omen. (In 2010 one of

the original Apple I computers was sold at auction by Christie’s for $213,000.)

 

The first feature story on the new machine appeared in the July 1976 issue of

Interface, a now-defunct hobbyist magazine. Jobs and friends were still making

them by hand in his house, but the article referred to him as the director of

 

marketing and “a former private consultant to Atari.” It made Apple sound like

a real company. “Steve communicates with many of the computer clubs to

keep his finger on the heartbeat of this young industry,” the article reported,

 

and it quoted him explaining, “If we can rap

about their needs, feelings and motivations,

 

we can respond

appropriately

by giving them

what they want.”

www.qhfbbb.com

Years later, when I raised it with him, Gates did not recall being

Years later, when I raised it with him, Gates did not recall being that upset.

The purchase of NeXT, he argued, did not really give Apple a new operating

system. “Amelio paid a lot for NeXT, and let’s be frank, the NeXT OS was never

 

really used.” Instead the purchase ended up bringing in Avie Tevanian, who

could help the existing Apple operating system evolve so that it eventually

incorporated the kernel of the NeXT technology. Gates knew that the deal was

 

destined to bring Jobs back to power. “But that was a twist of fate,” he said.

“What they ended up buying was a guy who most people would not have

predicted would be a great CEO, because he didn’t have much experience at it,

 

but he was a brilliant guy with great design taste and great engineering taste.

He suppressed his craziness enough to get himself appointed interim CEO.”

 

Despite what both Ellison and Gates believed, Jobs had deeply conflicted feelings

about whether he wanted to return to an active role at Apple, at least while Amelio

was there. A few days before the NeXT purchase was due to be announced, Amelio

 

asked Jobs to rejoin Apple full-time and take charge of operating system

development. Jobs, however, kept deflecting Amelio’s request.

 

Finally, on the day that he was scheduled to make the big announcement, Amelio

called Jobs in. He needed an answer. “Steve, do you just want to take your money

and leave?” Amelio asked. “It’s okay if that’s what you want.” Jobs did not answer;

 

he just stared. “Do you want to be on the payroll? An advisor?” Again Jobs stayed

silent. Amelio went out and grabbed Jobs’s lawyer, Larry Sonsini, and asked what

he thought Jobs wanted. “Beats me,” Sonsini said. So Amelio went back

behind closed doors with Jobs and gave it one more try.

 

“Steve, what’s on your mind?

What are you feeling?

Please, I need

a decision now.”

www.qianhuaeu.com

A few weeks later Jobs and his family went to Hawaii for Christmas

A few weeks later Jobs and his family went to Hawaii for Christmas vacation.

Larry Ellison was also there, as he had been the year before. “You know, Larry,

I think I’ve found a way for me to get back into Apple and get control of it

 

without you having to buy it,” Jobs said as they walked along the shore. Ellison

recalled, “He explained his strategy, which was getting Apple to buy NeXT, then

he would go on the board and be one step away from being CEO.” Ellison thought

 

that Jobs was missing a key point. “But Steve, there’s one thing I don’t understand,”

he said. “If we don’t buy the company, how can we make any money?” It was a

reminder of how different their desires were. Jobs put his hand on Ellison’s left

 

shoulder, pulled him so close that their noses almost touched, and said,

“Larry, this is why it’s really important that I’m your friend.

You don’t need any more money.”

 

Ellison recalled that his own answer was almost a whine: “Well, I may not need

the money, but why should some fund manager at Fidelity get the money?

Why should someone else get it? Why shouldn’t it be us?”

 

“I think if I went back to Apple, and I didn’t own any of Apple, and you didn’t

own any of Apple, I’d have the moral high ground,” Jobs replied.

“Steve, that’s really expensive real estate, this moral high ground,” said Ellison.

 

“Look, Steve, you’re my best friend, and Apple is your company. I’ll do whatever

you want.” Although Jobs later said that he was not plotting to take over Apple

at the time, Ellison thought it was inevitable. “Anyone who spent more than a

half hour with Amelio would realize that he couldn’t do

 

anything but self-destruct,” he later said.

The big bakeoff between NeXT and Be was held at the Garden Court Hotel in Palo

Alto on December 10, in front of Amelio, Hancock, and six other Apple executives.

NeXT went first, with Avie Tevanian demonstrating the software while Jobs displayed

 

his hypnotizing salesmanship. They showed how the software could play four video

clips on the screen at once, create multimedia, and link to the Internet. “Steve’s sales

pitch on the NeXT operating system was dazzling,” according to

Amelio. “He praised the virtues and

 

strengths as though

he were describing

a performance of

Olivier as Macbeth.”

qianpcd.com

Apple’s chief technology officer, Ellen Hancock, argued for going

Apple’s chief technology officer, Ellen Hancock, argued for going with Sun’s

UNIX-based Solaris operating system, even though it did not yet have a friendly

user interface. Amelio began to favor using, of all things, Microsoft’s Windows

 

NT, which he felt could be rejiggered on the surface to look and feel just like a

Mac while being compatible with the wide range of software available to

Windows users. Bill Gates, eager to make a deal, began personally calling Amelio.

 

There was, of course, one other option. Two years earlier Macworld magazine

columnist (and former Apple software evangelist) Guy Kawasaki had published a

parody press release joking that Apple was buying NeXT and making Jobs its CEO.

 

In the spoof Mike Markkula asked Jobs, “Do you want to spend the rest of your life

selling UNIX with a sugarcoating, or change the world?” Jobs responded, “Because I’m

now a father, I needed a steadier source of income.” The release noted that “because

 

of his experience at Next, he is expected to bring a newfound sense of humility back to

Apple.” It also quoted Bill Gates as saying there would now be more innovations from

Jobs that Microsoft could copy. Everything in the press release was meant as a joke,

 

of course. But reality has an odd habit of catching up with satire.

Slouching toward Cupertino

“Does anyone know Steve well enough to call him on this?” Amelio asked his staff.

 

Because his encounter with Jobs two years earlier had ended badly, Amelio didn’t want

to make the call himself. But as it turned out, he didn’t need to. Apple was already

 

getting incoming pings from NeXT. A midlevel product marketer at NeXT, Garrett Rice,

had simply picked up the phone and, without consulting Jobs, called Ellen Hancock to

see if she might be

 

interested in taking a

look at its software.

She sent someone

to meet with him.

qianpdd.com